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Camano Island

Camano Island is your chance to visit one of Puget Sound’s Islands without having to take a ferry. With quick access, and a laid-back rural atmosphere, no-wonder it’s called, “The Easy Island.”  Located just a few minutes’ drive off of Interstate 5, the island is your chance to walk uncrowded beaches, hike through forests and enjoy life at a slower pace.  The many seaside parks are the island’s star attractions.  Cama Beach and Camano Island State Parks offer spectacular views of Puget Sound. 

Cama Beach was a former fishing resort popular here in the 1940’s and ‘50’s. You can rent rustic cabins that are steps from the water.  Many people rent boats at the Center for Wooden Boats along with crab pots.  They catch, then cook fresh crab right on the beach! Iverson Spit and English Boom are parks that are a must-do for bird-watchers.  English Boom also features an ADA-compliant trail near the beach. For the more adventurous visitor, Canopy Tours NW offers zip-lining through the trees.  Camano Island is home to dozens of artists and many have galleries open on the weekends, especially during the summer.  There’s an open studio tour held over two weekends each May. The Stanwood-Camano area is also home to the Great Northwest Glass Quest, a 10-day treasure hunt for glass art held each spring.  Camano Commons has become a mini-downtown with several casual dining and shopping opportunities, making it a “must-do” when visiting the island.  

Both Cama Beach State Park and Camano Island State Park offer year-round cabin rentals. (see permit info.)

Watchable Wildlife - Blue Heron
As you are driving along the waterways of the Cascade Loop, be on the lookout for the majestic Great Blue Heron. They are regularly spotted wading in shallow water, patiently watching for small fish or frogs, their most common meals. Read More >>>>
Top 10 Fall Color Corridors on the Cascade Loop
The thing that folks love most about the Cascade Loop is its diversity of views throughout the byway, and fall colors are no exception. The colors are wild and vibrant and showcase a range of colors and textures as you explore the route. Travel counter-clockwise for the best views and know that as always, Mother Nature sets the schedule for when and how the colors change. Typically however, travelers can expect peak colors from the last week of September through mid-October. Special note: due to COVID-19 most Autumn public events… Read More >>>>
A Whale of a Tail
There are few animals in the wild as thrilling to see as a whale. Here in Washington state, we are fortunate enough to be on the migration route for several species of whale as they travel from Alaska to warmer southern waters to breed, then back again to Alaska to feed on the colder ocean’s bounty. The most common whale sightings are of Orca and Gray whales, some of whom find the Puget Sound and the Salish Sea such a beautiful area that they decide to stick around all year. That… Read More >>>>
Ten Treks To Take--Winter on the Cascade Loop
Looking for some fresh air, space to move freely and get that heart a pumpin'? Look no more! The Cascade Loop has all manner of outdoor activities to keep you busy, happy and health this winter! Read More >>>>
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